Operational Control

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NBAA Operational Control Handbook

The NBAA Operational Control Handbook summarizes government rules, regulations and policies applicable to the operational control of aircraft. The topic is far broader than the piloting of an aircraft or the manipulation of its controls. Operational control extends in particular to legal and regulatory responsibility for a flight's operation. It often affects parties with no direct involvement in the physical aspects of operating an aircraft.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has taken an increasing interest in operational control issues in recent years and the trend is likely to continue – a good reason for NBAA Members to be thoroughly familiar with the subject. In the final analysis, though, operational control is primarily about safety – an even better reason for Members to be thoroughly familiar with it.

Topics covered in the Operational Control Handbook include:

  • Overview
  • Introduction to Operational Control
  • Operational Control in a Part 91 Internal Flight Department Environment
  • Operational Control in a Part 91 External Flight Department Environment
  • Operational Control in a "Managed Charter" Environment
  • Operational Control in a Pure Charter Environment
  • Operational Control in a Fractional Aircraft Program
  • Recommendations and Conclusions
  • Appendix: Operational Control Chart

Download the NBAA Operational Control Handbook (1.58 MB, PDF)

If you have questions or feedback about the NBAA Operational Control Handbook or related topics, contact NBAA's Mark Larsen at (202) 737-4473 or [email protected].

Operational Control News

FAA Updates Guidance on Part 91 Letters of Authorization
December 27, 2012
The FAA recently updated its Flight Standards Information Management System (FSIMS) guidance on Part 91 Letters of Authorization. The updated guidance clarifies the appropriate Flight Standards District Office (FSDO) to which an operator should apply for a given authorization and clarifies that Letters of Authorization must be issued to the person or entity that intends to operate the aircraft under the LOA. When an aircraft is owned by more than one person, or is leased, each operator must have an LOA unless otherwise specified in the applicable regulation or FSIMS. View FSIMS Volume 3, Chapter 3, Section 2: Responsibility for Part 91 Letters of Authorization (LOA)